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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
to negotiate. and they fired back that the debate over the debt ceiling was the perfect time to consider legislation to cut spending. at the same time, only a handful of republicans have actually said they'd let the united states default on its bills. >> the president claims this, but republicans have always raised the debt ceiling. we've never seen the debt limit fail to be raised. all they have said is we want to apply the same criteria that the president himself applied when he was a senator and say we don't want to give the president a blank check. we would like to fix the substantive problem which is the level and the growth in the debt. >> reporter: markets are almost treating the fight over the debt ceiling as the sequel to a bad movie. and investors have a pretty good feel for how this cliffhanger ends. >> they don't really care about the brinksmanship until they are right up to the brink, but also, the more dangerous the fall, off the brink, they figure the less likely that it's going to happen. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner told congress today that unless it
figures show it is possible for the u.s. government to avoid defaulting on its debts even if the debt ceiling is not raised. >> and there is no reason for the government to default unless president obama and the democrats want us to. it's just a scare tactic to continue the spending that they don't want to address. that's why they keep saying, "oh, we're going to default. we're going to default. we're going to default." it's just not true. >> reporter: but talk like that scares many budget analysts in washington. they argue markets will see a failure by the unit ed states to pay any of its bills as a threat it could one day stop paying some or all of its bills, including interest on its debt. >> if we pay the chinese the interest we owe them on their sovereign debt holdings, on time and in full, but we don't pay social security recipients or armed services personnel their salaries, is that a default? well, of course it is. >> reporter: a recent inspector general's report found the treasury doesn't have the computer systems in prioritize some payments over others. so if the treasury ru
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)